The Craft of Teaching

Brokering Learning; reflections for #fslt MOOC

Overview; This third reflective blog post on my learning and teaching is about how I developed my professionalism as a teacher in the After Math of beginning to teach computing in a UK college instead of politics in a USA University; it’s how the light gets in. I think I eventually developed a craft of teaching which, as Malcolm Gladwell and Richard Sennett argue, takes 10,000 hours.

Getting by on teaching alone; Intrigued by my Greek friend Eli Georgeadou’s suggestion that my teaching skills alone enabled me to teach Computing, and also being unemployed with a baby on the way, I decided to take up her offer. Unsurprisingly I got Mathematics (Numeracy Skills), Organisational Theory and English (the Americans had failed to overthrow English), on Computer Studies and Systems Analysis courses. That year was more terrifying than delivering my first class with my arm in a sling after a car crash as I KNEW NUFFINK! No back-up, de nada. I did learn to be completely honest and Continue reading

Everything Unplugged

Royal Festival Hall 2 May 2012

Everything meets every week and began as School of Everything Unplugged, emerging from Dougald Hine & Paul Miller‘s learning start-up as a kind of reflective space for ongoing discussions.  Any topic related to learning that members want to discuss that week is up for discussion; the subtitle is “learning conversations” This week it was stress and learning as a gently rambling group discussion, without any real lead (although proposed & explained by David Jennings. We also try to invite someone along almost every week to challenge us to broaden the discussions. If you want to come along you can join the group on Facebook

There are core members including me (now). David Jennings (@agilelearn) and Tony Hall (@tonyhall) have been there since the start on 9/9/9. Regulars include Annie, Lucy, Ian, Paul, Patrick, (yep it is a bit blokey), irregulars include Clodagh, Bronya and Sara. This week we were unusually reflective going back to the origins of the group, which I looked up and tweeted to some response namely “how we enable learning in extra-institutional contexts through conversations around people’s interests” what might be called Open Learning. There was a feeling that as a group we are all the same page when it comes to open learning but we have very diverse practice; home, cultural, contextual, agile, convivial, social media, school, doctoral, inclusion, policy, work-based. #extremecollaboration

Open Academic Practice; The new JISC funded project on Open Academic practice is underway and I have signed up with the Open Brookes project and their MOOC which runs from 21 May to 12 June 2012 and this blog will be where I feed my reflections back into the process. However I want to use the OAP initiative, which tends to interpret “open” as “access” to university, to examine broader issues of Open Academic Practice as Nigel Ecclesfield and I described in “Co-creating Open Scholarship” as I think open is currently defined far too narrowly. It is defined by Universities about their traditional education practice. It needs to be so much more… Continue reading